Great Fathers {Sunshine Sundays}

Good morning. It’s Father’s Day in Australia. If you need to whizz to the shops and buy roses for your special father, then do it NOW before they are up. You may even have time to make a coffee for him, before he’s out of bed…

I think I will do the coffee thing for my husband. He’ll like that.

I would like to say that as far as fathers go, my girls are pretty lucky. When I quizzed my daughter what she would like to write in her mini book about her dad, her poem went something like…

All The Ways I Love My Dad

I love my dad because he’s special.

I love my dad because he’s so kind.

I love my dad because he’s beautiful.

I love my dad because he sings lovely songs. 

I love my dad as big as a big watermelon. That’s how big I love my daddy.

As big as her four-year-old frustrations and her temper tantrums can be, they are no match for the biggness of her love for her dad. She tells me, when she is feeling particularly warm and generous towards me, that she loves me as much as she loves Dad, and that is an incredible lot. She reaches her hands as wide as they can possibly go to show how big the love is.

At night, my daughter has a game she invented before bed. It’s called the ‘clappy game’. Basically, the clappy hands have to decide who’s taking her to bed. She positions Gregor and me at either end of the living room, and proceeds to clap. The little clappers head towards the parent of choice, and the decision is made.

Mostly, the clappies head towards their dad. If they head my way, it’s usually because she feels bad the clappies usually choose Gregor. And often, once I am lying down with her, she’ll whisper, ‘Actually, I really feel like having Dad.’ She doesn’t want to hurt my feelings, but then I can’t deny they have a special connection.

‘It’s ok, sweetie,’ I whisper back.

The fact is, he loves his girls so purely and so simply. He oozes love for them from every pore of his body. She knows this.

Maybe it’s a learnt thing. Maybe it’s hereditary, his way of loving.

His grandfather, Opa, loved him like that. Pure. Simple.

Gregor talked about his early memories of feeling loved by his grandfather, and I am sure that affection is at the root of Gregor’s self-esteem and self-love.

When we visited Opa in Austria a couple of years ago, I watched Gregor sit with his grandfather. ‘Ja, Ochi,’ he would say softly, tenderly, as his grandfather recounted tales of his youth. He held his grandfather’s hand in his.

When we said goodbye, my husband’s eyes welled with tears. Opa sang – an Austrian mountain song. We all cried.

Opa passed away in July. The news wasn’t a shock – he’d been sick. But it never makes sense when someone leaves the world, no matter how old or sick they are.

How can he not be here anymore?

I only met him a couple of times. He didn’t speak English, and I don’t speak German. But his presence in our sunshine lives was so strongly felt. Most mornings, he came up in conversation during breakfast. ‘This is Opa cheese,’ my four-year-old would say, referring to the blue vein.

She frequently drew pictures for Opa.

I’d print off photos of the girls to send to him, or make him albums or videos of things we had been doing. He’d ask for one of me too, and tell Gregor how lucky he was to have found me.

Now he’s not there to send them to.

It’s not just talk of Opa that fills our house, though. It’s his love.

It seeped into Gregor, from when he was a little boy living in Austria, through to the last conversation he ever had with his grandfather a few days before he passed away.

Opa was generous in a way I’ve known few people to be. Maybe it was living through horrific times, war, famine etc.

Maybe he was just wired like that. But he kept giving.

Thankfully, generosity, like love, is hereditary.

The happiest people I know are the most generous

And through Gregor, Opa has taught me too to be generous. It’s not my default position, but surrounding myself with the likes of Gregor and the presence of his grandfather has made me not even question the biggest selfless act.

Maybe because there is a simple equation. Being generous makes you happy. Or maybe you need to be happy to be generous. Maybe both.

Opa’s physical presence has left the world. On the day he died, my daughter told me Opa’s very flat now, and living on a star. But his kindness and generosity are in Gregor, in me, in the girls.

Sorry, I didn’t mean to get so sentimental. Father’s Day does funny things to the brain.

Please, link up your ‘father’ post, or share anything you would like to on the topic, either in the linky, in the comments or on social media at #sunshinesunday.

Happy Father’s Day. Love and be generous today. xx

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  • Renee at Mummy, Wife, Me

    What a lovely post, Zanni. I can see how special Opa is to your family and that he will be part of your lives and memories for ever. My father-in-law died six weeks before our eldest was born. He was such an amazing man. We were all deeply saddened that he would never get to see the baby girl we went everything through to get. We keep his memory alive though and talk about him most days also. I love Miss Four’s poem for Gregor. Very special. The clappy game sounds like fun too. Lovely to get an insight into your lives. I hope Gregor has a wonderful day today with his girls x

    • Thank you Renee. We actually had such a gorgeous day. No presents other than a handmade coffee cup, but it was so perfect. Hope you guys had fun too. Your girls dad sounds pretty exceptional xx

  • What a lovely story – girls have such an amazing bond with their dads. My daughter is big now (17) and she can still wrap her father around her little finger. Your description of your husband’s is Opa is just so beautiful. You will carry him with you forever.
    Kate

    • Thank you Kate. He was a special man. Thank you so much for being part of Sunshine Sundays today. xx

  • Zanni, I love that poem, so gorgeous and full of love. Bell would definitely prefer John to tuck her in, but there’s not much calm going on, lots of playing and much giggling!
    My dad never got to meet her, but Bell has heard many stories about him.
    We’ve had lots of Father’s Day celebrating here this morning, much of it handmade. I love the excitement of the build-up when they’re little.
    I’m so happy to see Sunshine Sundays is back. Thanks for the linkup Zanni x

    • It’s the dad’s requirement to make their kid’s giggle and play. 🙂 Hope you had a lovely father’s day Lisa xx

  • Rita@thecraftyexpat

    What a cute poem your daughter wrote to her dad! Adorable! Happy Father’s day to your hubby Zanni!

    • Thanks Rita! Yes… I particularly liked the watermelon bit of the poem 🙂

  • Emma Fahy Davis

    Oh I missed that Sunshine Sundays was back, Facebook never gives me the notifications I want 🙁 I’ll be here next week!

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